Re: Chocolate chip walnut cookies

This cookie has dark chocolate, white chocolate chips and walnuts

There’s nothing like the smell of freshly baked chocolate chip cookies out of the oven. Two words come to mind – home and smile. And isn’t that what warm chocolate chip cookies are? I don’t know anyone who frowns upon receiving cookies. It’s a cozy sweet hug and smile adorned with ooey gooey melted chocolates and crunchy walnuts wrapped in a comforting cookie package. Before you get yourself some warm milk, below is my tried and tested chocolate chip walnut cookie recipe. If you want to go nut free, skip the walnuts and substitute another kind of chocolate or dried fruit. 

Ingredients:

½ cup unsalted room temperature butter

½ cup brown sugar

½ cup white granulated sugar

1 egg

1 tsp vanilla extract

1 ½ cup all purpose flour (sifted)

¼ tsp ground coffee 

Pinch of salt

½ tsp baking soda

¼ tsp baking powder

½ cup bar 70% dark chocolate shards (around 1 bar) 

½ cup chopped walnuts 

Dash of ground cinnamon

Procedure:

  1. Chop dark chocolate and walnuts to pea size pieces then set aside in a bowl
  2. In a large bowl cream unsalted room temperature butter with brown sugar and white sugar
  3. Once the sugars are incorporated in the butter (the butter tends to turn lighter in colour), add the egg and vanilla extract to the mixture
  4. Sift together all purpose flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt 
  5. Add cinnamon and ground coffee to the flour mixture then stir with a fork to ensure even distribution 
  6. Combine the flour mixture in the butter mixture
  7. Add chopped walnuts and chocolates in the bowl
  8. Form cookies using an ice cream scoop or a regular spoon
  9. After forming the cookies, place in the fridge until the oven is preheated to 375 degree fahrenheit 
  10. Take out the cookies and bake for 14 minutes or until the edges of the cookies are golden brown

**This recipe makes 12 cookies.** You can use white chocolate or milk chocolate instead of dark chocolate. This cookie dough also freezes well if you’d like to save some for a rainy day. 

Always,

K

Re: Cornbread Recipe

If I had to pick my all time favourite side, it would probably be cornbread. I just love how sweet yet savoury and slightly crunchy yet moist it is! It’s a shame that cornbread is not a staple in all BBQ restaurants (at least in Canada), or restaurants in general. Needless to say, I was craving some cornbread a few weeks ago and decided to develop my own recipe. It’s been a hot minute since I last posted about a recipe, and it was so much fun cr[eating] this one! This cornbread recipe makes a sweet, moist yet fluffy treat for breakfast, lunch and dinner. 

Ingredients:

¾ cup yellow cornmeal

¾ cup AP flour

½ cup sugar 

1 ½ tsp baking powder

½ tsp baking soda

Salt (about a pinch)

1 cup buttermilk

5 tbsp brown butter (or melted butter)

2 tbsp oil 

2 eggs 

Splash of maple syrup

Procedure:

  1. Preheat the oven to 425 degrees fahrenheit.
  2. Grease an 8×8 baking square with butter
  3. Sift AP flour, cornmeal, baking powder and baking soda in a large mixing bowl
  4. Add sugar and salt to the dry ingredients after sifting
  5. Mix well to incorporate 
  6. In a separate bowl, whisk the buttermilk, brown butter, oil, eggs and maple syrup together well
  7. Combine dry ingredients and wet ingredients and mix until incorporated, try not to over mix the batter 
  8. Pour the mixture in the baking square, spread evenly and tap the square a few times to let any bubble burst
  9. Bake for 18-20 minutes or until golden brown

Substitutions:

I don’t typically have buttermilk in my fridge so I thought it was important to test out alternatives. Around 1 cup plain yogurt (greek or regular yogurt) works well with a little (~3 tbsp) almond milk. The almond milk helps loosen the viscosity of the batter. Bake in a 400 degree fahrenheit over for 27-32 minutes or until the cornbread is cooked all the way through. Using the substitutions doesn’t change the taste, but I did find the crust was thicker and crunchier while still keeping the inside of the cornbread moist. 

Always,

K

P.S. If you’re just starting to learn how to bake, keep it up! Baking could be intimidating at first between the measurements, temperatures and reactions, but it’s also the most fun way to experiment. I made about 7-10 cookie batters before I ever made a decent one. It taught me that failing could be fun sometimes. What matters more is how you can still find a way to creatively think of remedies. 

Kitchen Fails

1I’m not afraid to admit that not every recipe or dish I made has gone smoothly. Even if I put thought into which flavours to combine, the measurements I should use when baking or even the amount of time I should cook certain food, there are some dishes that are complete fails. And you know what, I’m okay with that. It doesn’t make me any less passionate and motivated to cook/bake. When I think about it, it actually encourages me to keep doing it. Every professional chef or incredible home cook will tell you that cooking and baking takes practice. Experience helps you understand which boundaries you can push and which ones you ought to stick to.

As much as cooking and baking is an art, it is an edible science. So for those feeling like cooking is a daunting skill to learn, just think, even Julia Child needed to learn how to whisk before making a meringue. Take it one spoon at a time.

 

Always,

K